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Chiropractic Awareness Week 2022: Stay Active

Happy Chiropractic Awareness Week everyone!

Are you aware that over half of us regularly suffer with backaches, neck pain or headaches? So why not seek out professional advice sooner rather than later to sort out those pesky niggles before it becomes a serious problem.

Take care of the back you have, because we have never heard of a replacement spine, have you?!

Here are our top 5 tips to help you to spinal health bliss:

Sitting Posture: Support your lower back when sitting down at your desk or at home, try not to curl up on the sofa, as it’ll twist your spine causing back ache and possible problems in the future.

Bedtime: Sleeping on your back (with a pillow behind your knees) is best for your spine. If you really want to sleep on your side, then put a pillow between your knees so you don’t twist into the recovery position.

Keep active! Get into the habit of taking a brisk walk daily. Try to make it fun or work out with a group like  class or running group.

Pain is often a warning sign. If something is hurting, don’t ignore it. Particularly important this time of year when we start hitting that gardening again!

Ice. If you’re achy use an ice pack, wrapped up in a tea-towel for 5-10 minutes every half an hour to calm any swelling and promote recovery.

We hope this helps, but if you would like more specialist advice for your particular problem please do not hesitate to contact our principal chiropractor Philippa Oakley.

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back pain older adults chiropractic

BackCare Awareness Week: Back pain in Older Adults

Back pain is one of the major disabling health conditions among older adults aged 60 years and older. Many causes of lower back pain are age-related with physical and psychosocial changes. There is a distinct lack of awareness, especially in older adults to the causes and effects of back pain and pain management.

Existing evidence suggests that prevalence rates of severe and chronic low back pain increase with older age. As compared to working-age adults, older adults are more likely to develop lower back pain like osteoporotic vertebral fractures, tumors, spinal infection, and lumbar spinal stenosis

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The Lancet Research Paper: Update

Time after time the research shows that chiropractic care should be the first-line intervention for low back pain. “Chiropractors are well placed to provide evidence-based non-pharmacological care for their patients with low back pain, including advice about physical activity, applying judicious manual therapy, education that supports self-management, and a graded return to normal activities and exercise.”

It’s time to move away from surgery, scans and strong painkillers and instead focus on what works.

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Fitness February

Throughout February we have been posting our top tips to get fit and healthy the best way possible in February. Here’s to committing to your workouts after the initial ‘New Year’ rush! Are you ready for our top tips to conquer ‘Fitness February’!? (More to be added soon!)

Protect Your Neck – Tuck your chin in and put your tongue on the roof of your mouth when you do crunches. It will help align your head properly, which helps reduce neck strain.

Don’t exercise when you’re sick – You’re better taking a day off so your body will use its resources to heal itself, not build muscle and endurance.

If you want to exercise before work but aren’t a morning person, try this trick: For a set period, let’s say 4 weeks, force yourself to get up 15 minutes earlier than normal and go outside for a quick walk. Make it so easy that you don’t even have to change into your workout clothes. As you near the end of the 4 weeks, you’ll have a new habit and will then be able to progress to either longer walks or a run in the morning!

Improve your balance – Stand one-legged on a sofa cushion and move a medicine ball (or heavy phone book) from hand to hand, side to side, and behind your head. Once you’ve mastered the move, try it with your eyes closed. This technique will improve your balance, coordination, and body control, all important athletic attributes.

Run Injury-Free – One week out of every six, cut your weekly training mileage and frequency in half. You’ll give your body a better chance to recover, and you’ll avoid permanent, nagging injuries. Find out more in our Running without pain resource.

Run Hills Faster – When running uphill, keep your head up and your eyes focused on the top of the hill. This opens your airways, making it easier to breathe than if your upper body were hunched forward. Find out more in our Training, Injury prevention and recovery resource.

Loosen Your Hips – Keep your heels on the floor when you squat. If you can’t, your hip flexors are too tight and need to be stretched out! Try this stretch: Hold onto the sides of the squat rack and lower yourself until your thighs are parallel to the ground. Hold this for 30 seconds. Return to a standing position, then repeat five times

Replace Your Shoes (Not Your Knees) – To avoid injuries, write an “expiration date” on your shoes as soon as you buy them. Shoes last about 500 miles, so simply divide 500 by your average weekly mileage to determine how many weeks your shoes are likely to last.

End Back Pain – For every set of abdominal exercises you perform, do a set of lower-back exercises. Focusing only on your abs can lead to poor posture and lower-back pain.

Pain in the butt!

Little muscle- BIG pain! We wanted to tell you about a classic case that appeared in clinic this week as it may also help you – a lady in her mid 30’s came into clinic with excruciating pain and tingling sensations radiating down the back of her thigh. Good old ‘Dr Google’ had suggested this could be sciatica which had got her really worried.

On examination, we found a nasty little group of what are called “trigger points” (focal areas of hyperirritability within a muscle) in her gluteus minimus muscle, and palpation of these reproduced the exact pain she had been experiencing. But what is this? The referred pain generated from trigger points in the gluteus minimus is notorious for activating other trigger points in the TFL, quadriceps, gastrocnemius, hamstrings, and peroneal muscle groups- in fact, gluteus minimus referred pain is often referred to as “pseudo-sciatica”, as it so closely mimics the symptoms of sciatica.

What commonly causes a glute min trigger point?
– Walking or running on uneven ground
– Sitting on a wallet (hello chaps- we’re talking to you!)
– Limping (from a foot or lower leg injury)
– Driving long distances or sitting for long periods
– Sacroiliac joint dysfunction

Fortunately, with a comprehensive treatment programme which addresses the many components of this problem, this issue can be resolved swiftly and successfully in clinic, helping to relieve what is a literal “pain in the butt“!

Butt!? What is TRUE Sciatica?

Learn more with our online course – Understanding pain here.

Learn more here: https://acorn-health.thinkific.com/courses/understanding-pain

You may also be interested in reading:

Understanding Pain

Stay Ski-fit on the Slopes!

Hot Yoga: This Girl Can!

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