Tag: pain

World Health Day

World Health Day is celebrated on 7 April to mark the anniversary of the founding of the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 1948. Each year a theme is selected for World Health Day that highlights a priority area of public health concern in the world.

So whether you are looking to get fitter and start a new exercise regime…

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…are looking out for your families health….

Healthy mother and baby making gymnastics

…Or, suffering from musculoskeletal condition including back, neck and joint pain: Make health care a priority in 2015 and contact your local health care professional for advise.

Neck

To find out more about the WHO organisation, please click this link.

If you are in pain and need help, please book an appointment online or call us on 01243 379693.

Guest Blog: Calcium and Osteoporosis

Is Calcium supplementation alone always the answer in Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a multi-factoral disorder and nutrition is only one factor contributing to its development and progression.  Calcium supplementation is usually suggested yet we routinely exceed our dietary intake of calcium and therefore we shouldn’t be deficient on the modern diet.

Turning our attention to the nutrients that aid calcium’s absorption and retention, namely vitamin D and magnesium therefore seems more necessary as well as considering other lifestyle factors that could be depleting calcium stores.

Most of us are deficient in Vitamin D so having your levels checked with a GP is a good place to start when you are considering bone health.  The body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium from your diet and it also maintains serum calcium and phosphate concentrations which enables bone mineralization.  If you don’t have enough vitamin D, calcium cannot be absorbed from the diet and the body will take it from its stores in the skeleton.  This process weakens existing bones and prevents the formation of strong, new ones.  Vitamin D is found in oily fish such as salmon, tuna and mackerel (no more than 2 portions a week) as well as fortified foods.  Sunshine is also needed to synthesise vitamin D through the skin and just 10 minutes a day on your face and hands can be enough to increase your stores over the Summer (although please take precautions if you need to). Once you have had a test to determine your levels your GP can also recommend a vitamin D supplement to raise your levels.

The Role of Magnesium

Magnesium works with vitamin D to control calcium levels.  Magnesium is calcium’s pair in nature and it is the dietary ratio of these two minerals which ensures calcium absorption and retention.  If too much calcium is taken in the diet it suppresses the absorption of magnesium which results in calcium deficiency!  This ratio is exaggerated in the modern diet when tends to be high in calcium and low in magnesium rich foods.  For example in fish, there is 8mg of calcium and 26mg of magnesium whereas in milk there is 116mg of calcium but 12mg of magnesium – whilst milk contains more calcium it will be poorly absorbed due to the lack of magnesium.  Magnesium is another mineral that we are usually low in as the levels in our soil are depleted and most magnesium is found in the outer coating of grains which is removed during refining.  In addition, calcium is usually added to wheat which upsets the ratio again.  Start increasing your intake of magnesium rich foods by eating legumes, nuts and wholegrains so that the calcium you are eating can actually be absorbed!   Magnesium supplements are usually poorly absorbed but there are companies that make magnesium flakes that you can put in the bath (not Epsom salts) which are not only great for aching muscles but your body only absorbs what it needs from a more natural form.

Other factors to consider are sugar, high salt consumption, high protein intake, tea, coffee and alcohol which can wash away dietary magnesium so you must also consider these factors if you want to improve your bone health.  For your information, too little protein in your diet can be associated with poor recovery from osteoporotic fractures so make sure you include good quality protein at every meal.

What else can I do to help?

Resistance exercise (weights), in conjunction with the above dietary measures, can also have a beneficial effect on bone health as it increases bone density and reduces fractures.  These types of exercise works by putting tension on your muscles,  which puts pressure on your bones, which respond by creating fresh, new bone.  If you encounter pain or problems whilst exercising, be sure to let your chiropractor know so we can review your exercises and technique.
I hope this article has shown that whilst calcium has its place in managing osteoporosis and bone health, other factors are also necessary and should therefore also be considered once osteoporosis has been diagnosed but more importantly for its prevention.

This information is supplied by Registered Nutritional Therapist Nicola Russell from the Way to Eat, Midhurst.

To visit Nicola’s website, please follow the link here: The Way To Eat

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Nutritional Therapy & Chiropractic

We’re delighted to welcome the first of our guest blog writers.  Nicola Russell is a registered Nutritional Therapist based in Midhurst, who works closely with her clients to address how optimum nutrition can be the key to a healthy lifestyle.

The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame, in proper diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease

Thomas Edison, US Inventor 1847-1931

“I became interested in Chiropractic care after suffering from a bad back in my early 20’s following a fall from a horse when I was younger.  However, I have continued seeing chiropractors from that pred berries acorn health food fruitoint onwards as I came to understand that keeping my spine, joints and muscles flexible and moving freely ensures my body stays pain-free and able to cope with what I ask of it during day-to-day life.  Chiropractic care is not just for bad backs!

Nutritional Therapy looks at addressing nutritional imbalances which also effects chemical reactions and bodily functions, and works with clients on many levels to support the body towards healing itself.  Co-management of certain clients therefore makes sense and I think Chiropractic care and Nutritional Therapy naturally go hand in hand.

For those already suffering from musculoskeletal complaints, dietary modification could help with pain management.  For example, insulin resistance (a precursor to diabetes) is implicated in the pathophysiology of Metabolic Syndrome (a collection of risk factors that can lead to diabetes, strokeacorn health lettuce green and heart diseases) which may be linked to musculoskeletal pain (Seaman & Palombo, 2014).  An elevated body mass index could also indicate a pro-inflammatory boy chemistry and be seen as a potential initiator/promoter of pain too (Seaman, 2013) and it therefore may be incumbent upon chiropractors to identify those at risk and refer them on.   Insulin resistance, weight gain and other conditions can be reversed with the help of a Nutritional Therapist though the use of multiple strategies such as dietary and lifestyle modifications.

Chiropractors also work to encourage dietary and lifestyle modifications as they have recognised the importance of looking at the whole person in order to obtain optimum health.  I believe that proper nutrition, chiropractic care and regular exercise are the keys to good health!

Chiropractic health nutrition exercise fitness

Nicola Russell  BSc, mBANT, CNHC.T
The Way to Eat
07789 881622

Follow the Way to Eat on Facebook and Twitter.

If you would like any help or information about how nutritional therapy could help you, please contact nicola@thewaytoeat.co.uk

 

References

Seaman, D. (2013) ‘Body mass index and musculoskeletal pain: is there a connection?’ Chiropractic & Manual Therapies. 21:15

Seaman, D. and Palombo, A. (2014) ‘An overview of the identification and management of the metabolic syndrome in chiropractic practice’ Journal of Chiropractic Medicine 13(3): 210-9

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