Tag: neck pain

Why being in pain can make us grumpy

One of my Telehealth patients recently asked me “Why does my back always hurt more when I’m having a bad day at work?” A good question, and one that comes up quite regularly in fact! My simple response to this is normally something like “Because pain is an absolute blighter, and likes to kick us when we’re already down” but I thought today I’d put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard, these days) and explain why and how our mood and pain levels are linked.

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Fascial blading- how it can help reduce pain and improve function

Fascial blading is a form of gentle, instrument assisted soft tissue mobilisation. The blade itself acts as an extension of the practitioner’s hands and allows the clinician to gently identify and breakdown scar tissue adhesions and fascial restrictions.

Fascia is the cling-film like tissue that connects everything in the body. It runs along and through all our muscles, organs, vessels and nerves and even attaches on to our skeleton, forming a continuous 3D web of connective tissue. Traumas or scars to any area or the body can lead to problems in other areas through disruption of this connective tissue web.

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World Spine Day 2018

World Spine Day 2018

Today is World Spine Day and the theme this year is “Love your Spine”. Too often, we hear from our patients “my joints are wearing out”, “I’ve got a bad back”, “I’ve got a weakness there”, “my back’s gone again.”

…. When did we all stop loving our spines?

Let’s learn to love our spines again with some quick back pain facts from our chiropractor Philippa Oakley:

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Relieve pain and stiffness in your upper back

Chronic tension in your upper back? You can help relieve pain and stiffness by lengthening the muscles in the front of the neck to alleviate stress on the upper back.

Here’s a quick tip which shows you how to stretch out fascial tissue around the collarbone, which is also great for relieving neck pain if you’ve slept awkwardly or “tweaked” your neck.

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chiropractor better posture poor posture upper crossed syndrome Upper crossed posture postural muscles chiropractic chiropractor stress muscle imbalance Janda postural control weak inhibited suboccipitals stress stressed kinematic neck weak headache migraine sitting desk Emsworth Chichester Portsmouth Southampton Havant Cosham Southsea

How poor posture causes pain

Sitting at a desk all day may mean you’re conscious of poor posture. You’ll know it can lead to headaches, muscle pain, stress and more. You may therefore be familiar with “Upper Crossed Syndrome “without even knowing it.

It’s not a serious condition but it can give rise to headaches, migraines, joint pain, muscle pain and stress. If you’re a keen gym-goer, it can also prevent you being able to reach your optimal training threshold.

What is Upper Crossed Syndrome?

It’s caused by overlapping overactive and underactive muscles throughout the neck, chest and shoulders. The chest muscles (pectorals) and muscles at the rear or side of the neck (upper trapezius, levator scapulae, suboccipitals and sternocleidomastoid) are overly tight or “facilitated”. The deep flexor muscles in the front of the neck and the rhomboids, lower trapezius and serratus anterior muscles are weak or inhibited.

chiropractor better posture poor posture upper crossed syndrome Upper crossed posture postural muscles chiropractic chiropractor stress muscle imbalance Janda postural control weak inhibited suboccipitals stress stressed kinematic neck weak headache migraine sitting desk Emsworth Chichester Portsmouth Southampton Havant Cosham Southsea
Source: http://www.muscleimbalancesyndromes.com/janda-syndromes/upper-crossed-syndrome/

A chap called Janda coined the term “Upper Crossed Syndrome”. According to his book “Assessment and Treatment of Muscle Imbalance: The Janda Approach” Upper Crossed Syndrome can lead to…..

“Dysfunction, particularly at the atlanto-occipital joint, C4-C5 segment, cervicothoracic joint, glenohumeral joint, and T4-T5 segment.  Postural changes decrease glenohumeral stability as the glenoid fossa becomes more vertical due to serratus anterior weakness leading to abduction, rotation, and winging of the scapulae. This loss of stability requires the levator scapula and upper trapezius to increase activation to maintain glenohumeral centration (Janda 1988).”

You can see how a simple matter of muscular imbalance can lead to a range of issues.

What causes it?

This is caused by a build up of small issues, such as:

  • Prolonged sitting at a desk then causes forward head carriage.
  • Poor technique when training (such as overtraining the chest and neglecting the mid-back) affects the chest and upper back.
  • Having a large bust contributes to rounded shoulders.

What are the signs and symptoms?

  • Forward head carriage- when looking at yourself side-on in a mirror, your ear should be in line with your shoulder. If it’s not, it’s what we call forward head carriage.

    chiropractor better posture poor posture upper crossed syndrome Upper crossed posture postural muscles chiropractic chiropractor stress muscle imbalance Janda postural control weak inhibited suboccipitals stress stressed kinematic neck weak headache migraine sitting desk Emsworth Chichester Portsmouth Southampton Havant Cosham Southsea
    Source: https://www.physio-pedia.com/Age-related_hyperkyphosis
  • Increased inward curvature of the cervical spine (hyperlordosis).
  • Increased outward curvature of the thoracic spine (hyperkyphosis or “humpback”) . Tight muscles in the front of the chest pull you forwards, weak muscles in the upper back can’t resist the pull. Add in forward head carriage and you can end up with hyperkyphosis. In some cases, the neck can look normal because we simply overextend through the neck to hold the head up properly!
  • Breathing dyfsunction caused by over-activated muscles and compression of the rib cage.
  • Rounded shoulders and rotator cuff issues- Muscular imbalances affect the function of the shoulder joint. Due to the imbalance, rotator cuff muscles then have to work harder to stabilise the shoulder joint. This can ultimately lead to shoulder impingement and rotator cuff strain.
  • Winging of the scapula- the shoulder blades jut out instead of lying flat against the ribcage.
  • Chronic pain caused by trigger points (tender points) in the affected muscles.
  • Migraines and tension headaches due to tension in the surrounding muscles and dysfunction in the cervical and thoracic spine.
  • Pins and needles or tingling in the arms- Rounded shoulders and forward head carriage can compress the blood vessels or nerves in the space between your collarbone and first rib.

The affected muscles have a lower threshold for irritation and dysfunction. This means they very quickly become affected by faulty movement, leading to more pain and problems. As a result this puts stress on the involved joints, leading to further pain. As you can see, poor posture is contagious. Not like a bad cold shared around the office…  Instead it starts in one area and then affects another, which in turn affects another.

How can we treat Upper Crossed Syndrome and Poor Posture?

Your chiropractor will work with you to restore normal function to your upper back and neck. If underlying joint function is abnormal, exercising in this state may simply cause the muscles to adapt to the underlying dysfunction. (For more on this, read our stretching blog here.) This is why joint function must be restored first and foremost. Gentle stretches and exercises can then help relieve tension and strengthen the weaker muscles.

Here’s a video on our one simple way to improve your posture at the desk.

Begin with the chin tuck exercise. This ultimately counteracts forward head carriage.

chiropractor better posture poor posture upper crossed syndrome Upper crossed posture postural muscles chiropractic chiropractor stress muscle imbalance Janda postural control weak inhibited suboccipitals stress stressed kinematic neck weak headache migraine sitting desk Emsworth Chichester Portsmouth Southampton Havant Cosham Southsea
Source: http://www.orthoneurophysio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/download-1.jpg
  • Stand upright with your back to wall.
  • Slightly tuck chin to chest and draw head back to wall.
  • The muscles in the front of the neck should be active when holding this position for 5-10 seconds.

You may feel some stretching of the scalene muscles on the side of the neck that go down to the collarbone. You may also notice the suboccipital muscles at the top of the neck and the base of the skull. This exercise begins to strengthen the muscles in the front of the neck and muscles of the upper back.

You can do this exercise lying down in bed, pushing back into a pillow. Once you get the hang of it, you can then do it standing upright. You’ll soon be able to do this whilst sitting in the car or at your desk at work. Repeating the exercise throughout the day will also help improve your posture over time.

Chiropractic care can help to restore normal joint movement and alleviate muscle stress. As part of your treatment programme, you’ll be given further specific exercises to help address muscle tension and restore joint function.

To book your appointment with our chiropractor, simply use the link below.

2017 Small Business Saturday

We are opening our small family owned business in Emsworth to celebrate Small Business Saturday on the 2nd December 10-12pm offering free chats with practitioners about health problems and more.

Book a 10 minute posture check with Philippa Oakley DC MChiro, (limited spaces available, please call reception to book) and discover the range of therapies we have on offer here at Acorn Health.

Donations will be gratefully received for Neuroblastoma UK, suggested donation for posture check is £5.00. Find out more about the charity here.

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Virtual Chiropractic Care for the UK

Acorn Health Limited © 2014 - 2020

Website Created by WebHolism