Tag: leg

lady back pain christmas emsworth chiropractor

Back pain at Christmas- How to recover as quickly as possible

This time of year, we see an increase in people coming to see us for new episodes of back pain. These often follow a similar sort of story- carrying heavy bags of Christmas shopping, twisting awkwardly bringing the decorations down from the attic, or falling off ladders putting up festive lights.

If you’re struggling with back pain at Christmas, there are a few simple things that you can do to help yourself recover from an acute episode of back pain.

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Marathon Ready Workshops

This year we have hosted two popular running workshops with a twist on our popular “Running without pain” workshop concentrating on marathon training, injury prevention and recovery and increasing your training load.

Thank you to The Run Company for letting us take over your shop for those evenings!

There are some big races in every runner’s diary at this time of year, including the largest local marathon taking place in June and international races coming up in the Autumn. Nothing’s more disappointing than picking up an injury just a few days before the big event, so in this workshop, we took our guests through the top prevention steps everyone needs to know to prevent injury, helping you spend more time on the road and less in rehab.

We covered everything from overtraining to optimum performance tips as well as advice on the all-important recovery period, and an opportunity to speak to Philippa, Acorn Healths principle Chiropractor, one-on-one after the event for any specific questions or advice.

We had an Ultra-marathoner and a Tough Mudder runner who had specific questions on nutrition and keeping up their energy levels. We also talked to a few ladies who are looking to improve their stride to reduce expelling unnecessary energy, and a 10K runner interested in injury prevention. We also had a lady interested in increasing her walking to running without causing serious injury and a gentleman looking for information on running winter marathons.

Our events are never a dull affair, and all are encouraged to get involved and ask questions throughout the talk. We left the first event thinking about stocking up on jaffa cakes and jelly beans and the last one thinking about taking a nap! If you are interested in coming to one of our events please subscribe to Facebook events here or sign up to our newsletters here.

Book in for your pre-race MOT appointment here so we can get those backs mobilised, ribs moving freely to increase your lung expansion and thus your muscle moment and improve your hip flexion and extension for a better stride.

Your body is an intricate machine and just like any machine, things can go wrong from time to time. If you are in pain, it’s your body’s way of telling you that something isn’t right. Listen to it.

You may also be interested in:

Marathon Ready Resource

Understanding Pain Resource

Running without Pain Resource

Five top tips for avoiding sailing injuries and back pain

Living and working in Emsworth and Langstone, you’ll know that sailing is an inherent part of our community here (so much so, we’ve included some photos taken by Philippa of our lovely harbour!) As such, it’s not uncommon for us to be treating professional or recreational sailors in clinic, and whether you compete professionally or just enjoy a turn about the Solent, sailing poses as much a risk of injury as with any sport.Sailing windsurfing sport water exercise fitness health sail sailor boat boating yacht yachting dinghy barge windsurf chiropractor chiropractic physiotherapy physiotherapist osteopath osteopathy injury exercise health hampshire langstone emsworth fareham Sailors often compete in extremely difficult conditions, battling high winds and rough seas, and as such the risk of injury during sailing is 8.6 per 1000 hours sailing when training, and 2.2/1000 otherwise.  In a study on the 2003 America’s Cup, researchers found that the upper limb was the most commonly injured body segment (40%), followed by the spine and neck (30%), and the most common injuries were joint/ligament sprains (27%) and tendinopathies (20%). (1)

Who is at risk of injury?

Mastmen are at greatest risk of acute injuries, helmsmen most commonly injury the upper-limb through steering, whilst grinders and bowmen are at the greatest risk of injury from repetitive strains.  High repetition activities such as hiking, pumping, grinding and sterring are major causes of overuse injury, even in the most experienced of sailors.  Windsurfers are also frequently admitted to hospital suffering from chronic lower back injuries as a result of “pumping” the sail.

 

Sailing windsurfing sport water exercise fitness health sail sailor boat boating yacht yachting dinghy barge windsurf chiropractor chiropractic physiotherapy physiotherapist osteopath osteopathy injury exercise health hampshire langstone emsworth fareham
Windsurfing in Emsworth- photo taken by Philippa!

It’s not just the professionals who are at risk of injury, as novice and recreational sailors commonly encounter acute injuries such as contusions or abrasions after colliding with the boom or other equipment whilst performing manoeuvres. (1)  Not only that, but there are other perils to consider:  tripping over ropes, winches and cleats; being swept overboard or falling down open hatches!

 

How and why do sailing injuries occur?

[clickToTweet tweet=”What are the main contributors to #sailing #injuries? Find out here! #Chiropractic” quote=”The main contributors to sailing injuries are: Heavy weather (23%), tacking (17%), jibing (13%), sail change (12%) and alcohol (7%)”]

  • Injuries may result from a lack of general fitness, overuse, overtraining, or macrotraumatic accidents.

  • Lack of warming up, stretching, and cooling down may also increase the risk of injury.

  • Muscles are placed at high risk when performing explosive, powerful moves, such as those frequently required when sailing.

  • Shoulder and arm injuries are common through constant handling of the mainsheet, and the sudden, strong movements in hiking may lead to back and knee problems.  (Remember Sir Ben Ainslie’s back injury? This was caused by repetitive, high strain hiking out!)Sailing windsurfing sport water exercise fitness health sail sailor boat boating yacht yachting dinghy barge windsurf chiropractor chiropractic physiotherapy physiotherapist osteopath osteopathy injury exercise health hampshire langstone emsworth fareham

  • Inadequate leg strength and poor hiking technique are thought to predispose the knee to injury.

  • Boats can be difficult to navigate around and result in crew members having to adopt awkward positions, often resulting in rotating, hyperextending, locking, or twisting of joints.

  • Incorrect lifting technique (more advice on this here!)

  • Postural problems are common in the majority of the population, and these inherent issues can lend themselves to musculoskeletal problems.

  • Poor fitness training may exacerbate common muscular imbalances associated with changing forces on opposing muscle groups while sailing.

If ignored, it is easy for these issues to progress into a chronic problem, the possible severity of which could impact on your participation and enjoyment in the sport.

So what can be done about it? Five simple steps to avoiding sailing injuries!

  1.  A robust exercise regime is crucial, which should focus on all aspects of physical fitness in order to ensure that your body can cope with the demands of sailing.
    – Cardiovascular training
    – Strength training (Competitive sailors should undergo regular health screening with specific strengthening of high-risk muscle groups, synergists and stabilizers. )
    – Flexibility training
    – Core stability training
    – For more advice on bespoke rehabilitation plans, please email us at acorn@acornhealth.org.uk or visit our Langstone clinic.
  2. Research has shown that aerobic training and fitness is directly related to an improved reaction speed to wind shifts, as well as enhanced endurance, decision making, and concentration, particularly in the later stages of races. Mental and physical recovery is faster for those who are physically fit. Suggested types of aerobic exercise that are most appropriate for sailors are rowing, cycling, swimming, stair climbing, or running.(3)/li>
  3. Regular checkups can help ensure joint movement and function is maintained, as well as provide an opportunity for assessment of joint strength and function.  Not only will this help reduce the risk of developing injuries, but it can also speed up recovery should you become injured.
  4. Technical skill and expertise is important– if your technique needs improvement, seek out advice and informed coaching to help minimise the risk of developing an injury as a result of poor technique.
  5. Taking frequent breaks and changing positions during long periods of sailing. This will help prevent postural stresses and strains from occurring and is a healthy spinal habit we all should follow.

Whilst we have focused on musculoskeletal injuries, there are a number of other safety measures to take into consideration. Above all, always wear a life jacket when sailing. In the UK, there were 35 sailing or water-sport related deaths at sea in 2014 alone. Safety at sea should always be taken seriously.

Want more advice or information on this topic? Email us at acorn@acornhealth.org.uk or call the clinic on 01243 379693.

Boat sailing acorn health chiropractic

References:
1. Neville, V., Folland, J.P. (2009) The epidemiology and aetiology of injuries in sailing.  Sports Medicine. 39(2) 129-145.
2. Nathanson, Mello, Baird “Sailing Injuries and Illness – Results of an Internet-based survey” Wild Env Med 2010
3. Allen, J.B., De Jong, M.R. (2006) Sailing and sports medicine: A literature review. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 40(7) 587-593.

Marathon 101

The South Downs Marathon is this weekend. Thousands will be running, competing, having fun and raising money for charity all at the same time.

Whether you are an athlete, pro-runner or amateur there are some simple rules to stick by to prevent injury and pain after running all that way.  The South Downs Marathon is notoriously tough, so here’s our tips to help you overcome from the challenge!

1. Water – If it’s hot outside, you’ll need to drink more than usual, which is a challenge when you’re trying to run as well.  Please focus on hydration both pre- and post-race (being well hydrated will mean you recover more quickly too!) Don’t overlook the electrolytes you’ve lost through sweating. Rather than buy expensive, sugary energy drinks, simply add a few mmol of sodium (salt) or suitable electrolyte powde to your water. Tastes gross but does the trick!

2.  Don’t forget to eat. It might be the last thing on your mind after you’ve just run a hefty race but it’s important to rep
lenish your body with lost nutrients and electrolytes after expending so much e
nergy!

  • Replenishing stores of glycogen (what gives you your energy!) in the muscles and liver
  • Protein helps aid muscle repair
  • Restores fluid and electrolytes lost in sweat
  • Supporting the immune system in removing the lactic acid that can build up after strenuous activit

3. Kinesiotape is not only helpful when you’re out running to help support your joints and muscles, but it may alsoKinesiotape Running Pain Pregnany Sport Nike Chiropractic Adidas Hampshire Emsworth Sussex Physiotherapy Osteopath aid recovery from injuries by improving blood and lymphatic flow around the injured areas.

If you are reeling from any form of exercise this weekend and are in need of some assistance please contact the clinic on 01243 379693 or email acorn@acornhealth.org.uk

 

 

*Cover photo taken from www.209events.com


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Website Created by WebHolism