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Four steps to a successful week

So today, I woke up earlier than usual and have reached a rare moment of having achieved all of my urgent and important tasks on my list I needed to do today by 11:30 AM. This level almost never happens and it got me thinking- what was the difference in motivation levels today?

The truth is, there isn’t one thing, but instead a gradual accumulation of small changes that I’ve made to my lifestyle recently which I thought I’d share four top tips with you, that have helped me master Mondays!

First things first- I swear by my Lumie Bodyclock, and it is my best friend during the winter months. Waking up feeling groggy is horrible- as someone who used to have about 15 alarms on my iPhone to get me up (not even joking) a natural daylight lamp like the Lumie Bodyclock makes mornings slightly more bearable. It helps prevent what’s called sleep inertia– the inability to feel alert and perform when we first wake up. Studies have shown that these lamps help raise cortisol (an important hormone which helps with metabolism, memory and blood sugar), improve our reaction times and make us feel more refreshed. Not only that, but it’s lovely to wake up to daylight in these darker winter months. Step One: Wake up refreshed.

Question for you- did you make your bed this morning? I did- and here’s why you should too. Watch this video (6.01 minutes) for some inspiration that will get you going today. Step two: Make your bed.

I significantly cut down on caffeine recently, and now tend to start my mornings with a few glasses of water with lemon in it- I prepare this the night before and leave it in the fridge so it’s nice and cold to wake me up. Your metabolic rate is boosted by about 30% by drinking two glasses of water and the added lemon gives you around 40% of your daily vitamin C- great for the immune system. It also contains vitamin B6 which supports a healthy nervous system, and flavanoids which support the immune system and have anti-inflammatory benefits. Step Three: Boost your brain.

Then, I ate the frog. Not literally (I actually had a rather nice omelette for breakfast). Eat that frog comes from a saying by Mark Twain- and it refers to doing the thing you dread the most first. So for me, this was catching up on some bookkeeping (*urgh*) BUT it means that I’ve now completed that task and have the rest of the day to fill with things that I enjoy- like taking care of my patients. Reading some new research articles. Enjoying the sunshine at lunch (instead of being stuck at my desk). Step Four: Eat that frog.motivation healthcare health wellness chiropractic chiropractor emsworth hampshire fitness healthy lifestyle injury sports sciatica back pain neck headache migraine whiplash sciatica sciatic osteopath osteopathy physiotherapist physiotherapy

So there you have it- four simple steps to help you get going on a Monday, or in fact any day of the week!

Until next time,

Philippa.

Understanding our pain

How well do you understand the pain you experience?

Pain is defined as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage”, which is an interesting concept in itself as the definition clearly states that pain can be tangible, or simply mean that the potential for damage is there.

The amount of pain you experience does not relate to the severity of the injury you have sustained- think how painful a paper cut can be even though it is a relatively minor injury!  Similarly, we can continue to experience pain long after the original cause has resolved, simply because the body perceives that we are still in danger; this is due to changes in the local tissues.

One common misconception is that pain is produced by injured structures- but we now know that pain, no matter where or how it is felt, is produced by the brain. Before our brain will tell us something hurts, it will first process a vast amount of information before deciding if we need to experience pain.  Have you ever cut yourself and not realised until you looked down and saw blood?  This is because your brain processed the injury and did not perceive it as a threat to warrant pain signals.  Pain relies heavily on context and the brain’s perception of further threat- if you bump into a lamppost, it will hurt, but will it still be painful if you’re about to be run over by a train? Unlikely, because your brain will realise the incoming train is life threatening !

Pain can be both a help, and a hindrance- for example, if we put our hand on a hot stove, the acute pain we experience tells us that we are burning ourselves.  However, persistent pain can be very unhelpful as often it does not indicate ongoing damage.  This persistent pain is like leaving the volume knob on our radios turned up to maximum- it can block out other senses and become very disruptive in our lives.

When we are left with persistent or chronic pain, it can be hard to believe that there is no ongoing damage, it is because this persistent pain is more to do with our nervous system’s interpretation of the information it is receiving.  If you were asked to do the same task all day every day, it wouldn’t take long for you to become very good at it, performing the task quicker and more efficiently each time- the body can do exactly the same.  It can become very good at sending pain signals, and can actually adapt so that it sends these signals more frequently.  The body can then become so sensitive that it misinterprets normal messages (such as light touch) and responds to them as if they were dangerous.  We call this process “sensitization”.

What happens when our nervous system becomes sensitized?

When we perform recurrence activities they become familiar to us, and we become very good at doing them efficiently.  Now try to imagine if these activities were painful to perform.  If we perform these painful movements for long enough, the brain will associate the connection between those movements and pain, to the point that even preparing, or thinking about a movement can cause pain.  This can be very confusing and worrying if we do not understand why this is happening.

Deep, unexplained pain can often cause more worry and anxiety simply because we cannot see what is happening, nor can we sometimes understand why it is happening.  As the definition of pain says, it is both a physical AND an emotional experience- the two go hand in hand.

Have you ever noticed your back pain gets worse when you are stressed at work, or not sleeping well?  Have you ever noticed your back pain gets better when you’re on holiday, relaxing in the sunshine?  There is a vicious cycle that exists between pain and anxiety, which can be hard to break.

What we focus on as practitioners is addressing the factors that have led to us feeling pain. These factors can be our overall physical wellbeing, social environment, health beliefs, mental health, and social environment.  We aim to progressively increase your activity and work to restore your confidence in movement as these will all help to reduce your pain levels, and help break that vicious pain cycle and turn it into a positive experience whereby more movement and confidence means less pain.

So how do I help myself?

If we learn to view pain as a motivator to encouraging us to help our bodies, we can start to work with it to get ourselves better.

  • Exercise. Implementing strategies to encourage more physical activity will help your body release  feel-good chemicals (endorphins) which will make us feel better, blood flow to the brain increases and so our ability to function and concentrate improves, muscle strength and endurance will improve.  Remember, as you start to become more physically active, you are likely to continue to experience some pain- however, hurt does not equal harm.  With practice, and focus, normal movement will return and your pain levels will decrease.
  • Set yourself realistic goals.  As humans we often set ourselves up for failure by setting unattainable targets (New Year’s Resolutions being a prime example), and so when we do fail, we lose the motivation to try again.  Set yourself an attainable target, such as being able to walk the children to school and back within three months, or being able to hoover the lounge without sitting down. Competing in your very first triathlon in a months’ time is NOT an achievable target for everyone.
  • Take charge of your pain. Learn more about it, read around the subject, understand your condition.  By increasing your understanding and addressing your thoughts and feelings about pain, you can actually affect your own pain levels by giving yourself more control over your pain.  No health professional can take your pain away from you, you must take control.  There are a number of resources available to help you learn more:
    –  www.paintoolkit.org
    www.knowpain.co.uk
  • What is your coping strategy?  You might think that the sympathy offered to you by friends and family is helpful, but we actually know that those with a more attentive, concerned spouse/partner will report higher levels of pain.
  • If you have been prescribed help, this must make sense to you and increase your understanding of your problem.  If something does not make sense to you, ask, we are here to help.  A good clinician will help you master your situation but you must feed back to them if you do not understand what they say.
  • Research shows that if you have a good understanding of chronic pain, you can feel more in control, make better decisions in your self-management of pain, and experience less pain as a result.  Taking simple steps to increase your understanding of pain, such as reading and understanding this blog post, means you are already making a positive step to addressing and taking charge of your pain.

Download our “Understanding Pain” resource here.

World Spine Day 2018

Today is World Spine Day and the theme this year is “Love your Spine”. Too often, we hear from our patients “my joints are wearing out”, “I’ve got a bad back”, “I’ve got a weakness there”, “my back’s gone again.”

…. When did we all stop loving our spines?

Let’s learn to love our spines again with some quick back pain facts from our chiropractor Philippa Oakley:

Continue reading

Chiropractic Care for Migraine Prevention

Right now in the UK, over 190,000 people are suffering from a migraine attack. Despite the number of people affected by migraines, it’s still not know why they occur. It’s thought the genetics and environmental factors play a role. For those who suffer with migraines, you may not know that chiropractic care for migraines can help prevent you from suffering.

Quick facts about migraines:

  1. Migraines are a recurrent type of severe headache which, for some people, will happen throughout their lifetime.
  2. They’re most commonly described as episodes of disabling pain with headache, feeling or being sick, and sensitivity to normal levels of light and sounds.
  3. They can affect people of all ages (even young children).
  4. The head pain is usually one-sided, pulsating, and may worsen with normal physical activity (such as climbing the stairs).
  5. They can last from a few hours to a few days, and on average happen once or twice a month- for some people they have one a year, for others- one a week.
  6. Research has shown that in the USA and the UK, only half of people with a migraine had seen a doctor for this problem in the last twelve months, and only two-thirds of them had been diagnosed correctly. As a result, many migraine sufferers are reliant on over-the-counter medication and have poorly-managed migraine symptoms.
  7. Although migraine attacks affect a significant number of people the triggering processes for the headaches are not fully understood.
  8. At least 60% of people who suffer with migraine never consult their GP because they believe nothing can be done to help them. (Source)
  9. For many people the symptoms of migraine are a mixture of more than one type. This is why many specialists, including chiropractors, now talk about a “headache continuum”, with the less disabling mild tension headache at one end of the scale, and severely disabling migraines at the other.

    chiropractic care for migraines chiropractor migraine headache emsworth head pain migraine attack sufferers aura neurological spinning dizziness vertigo lights sounds attack headache
    Image: American Council for Headache Education

What causes migraines?

The truth is- no one really knows what causes a migraine. It may be that abnormal brain activity affects the chemicals, nerve signals and blood vessels deep in the brain. The release of inflammatory substances around these structures may be what causes pain.

It’s possible that your genes also make you more likely to suffer. There are several possible triggers that can lead to a migraine attack, including hormonal, emotional, dietary, physical, environmental or chemical/medicinal factors. These can vary from person to person and as such, it’s important to find out what your triggers are and learn how to manage them. This may be by avoiding certain types of foods, keeping to a regular sleep pattern or reducing chemical stressors such as stopping smoking.

Types of migraine

There are seven different classes of migraines- and some of these have further subclasses. We’re going to focus on the main two:

Migraine with aura
This type of migraine accounts for around 10-30% of people with migraines. These type of migraines do not present with an aura. In this case, aura means neurological symptoms, most commonly visual disturbances. These can present up to an hour before or during the migraine, and you may experience:

  • Blind spots
  • Coloured spots
  • Seeing sparkles, stars, flashing lights or zig-zagschiropractic care for migraines chiropractor migraine headache emsworth head pain migraine attack sufferers aura neurological spinning dizziness vertigo lights sounds attack headache
  • Tunnel vision

You might also experience:

  • Numbness or tingling
  • Pins and needles
  • Weakness on one side of the body
  • Dizziness or a feeling of spinning

Migraine without aura
These generally last for between 4 to 72 hours. Usually, you’ll feel a headache on one side of your head, which may throb or pulsate. They can affect your daily life and generally worsen with everyday exercise (such as walking or climbing stairs). Some people who suffer with these types of migraines also report feeling or being sick, having diarrhoea or being sensitive to light or sound.

This is the most common type of migraine accounting for 70-90% of attacks.

Chiropractic Treatment for Migraines: Prevention is better than cure

Chiropractic treatment has been shown to reduce the severity and frequency of migraine attacks, and is therefore recommended as a treatment for migraine prevention.  One study of 127 migraine sufferers in Australia found that those that received chiropractic treatment had fewer attacks and needed to take less medication. More than 80% of the study participants blamed stress for leading to their migraine attacks. The researchers therefore suggest that chiropractic care might physically help reduce the body’s reaction to stress.

Recent research studies suggest that chiropractic treatment for migraines might also be as efficient as amitryptaline, propranolol and topiramate in the prophylactic management of migraine.

Your chiropractor will provide hands on care and advice across a range of areas. This includes nutritional support, lifestyle management, and exercise. As such, you can work with Philippa to determine a “Migraine Prevention Programme” that works for you. Your treatment programme will address many of the factors that may contribute to migraine. This includes postural issues, muscle tension in the upper back, neck and shoulders, and restriction of movement in the neck and upper spine. Chiropractic care for migraine prevention can include nutritional support, acupuncture or dry needling, manual therapy, soft tissue techniques and more- all your treatment is bespoke to your needs.

If you have any doubts about whether a specific treatment type is suitable for you, please consult your chiropractor or GP.

Ever wondered what it feels like to experience migraine? Watch the video below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmJW8gYIN4E

References:

Bryans, R., Descarreaux, M., Duranleau, M., Marcoux, H., Potter, B., Ruegg, R., & White, E. (2011). Evidence-based guidelines for the chiropractic treatment of adults with headache. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics34(5), 274-289.

Chaibi A, Tuchin PJ, Russell MB. Manual therapies for migraine: a systematic review. J Headache Pain. 2011;12:127–133. doi: 10.1007/s10194-011-0296-6.

Nelson CF, Bronfort G, Evans R, Boline P, Goldsmith C, Anderson AV (1998) The efficacy of spinal manipulation, amitriptyline and the combination of both therapies for the prophylaxis of migraine headaches. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. 21: 511-519.

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The five secrets to relieve joint and muscle pain

Many new patients come to us at this time of year searching for help and advice on sciatica pain relief, how to relieve joint pain, lower back pain, muscle pain and more. Is it the weather that makes it worse? Hard to say!

Numerous studies have shown slim associations between pain factors such as temperature, wind speed, humidity and barometric pressure and their effect on pain. Whilst the research is inconclusive, we know that for many of our patients, being in pain make us sensitive to weather changes and those with conditions such as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis tend to be amongst the worst affected.

Chronic pain can leave our nerves more sensitive to stimuli, and if you’re feeling chilly, you’re likely to tense up against the cold which in turn can cause muscle pain and joint pain.

So aside from cranking up the thermostat, what can you do to stay warm?

Five secrets to staying warm this winter

Secret 1: Dress warmly and in layers.

You might be tempted to reach for a warm baggy jumper, but don’t forget to wear a close-fitting base layer. This will help keep that body heat close to your skin. Layers will help to trap other pockets of warm air to help insulate your body, which a single thick and heavy layer simply won’t do. This will help keep you warm and cosy, avoiding aches and pains as it gets colder outside.

Secret 2: Chilli Peppers

Capsaicin (the active ingredient in chilli peppers) is safe and effective when applied on the skin in a cream or rub. It can be helpful for soft tissue pain, back pain and more. Using muscle rubs is often easier than a hot water bottle but the warmth from thos will help too!

Note: Ask us about our Hotspot Muscle Rub next time you’re in clinic- it’s completely natural, more effective than comparative products and contains clove and devil’s claw (for reducing pain and inflammation) with capsicum to leave you feeling warm for hours afterwards.

Secret 3: Watch out for hot toddies.

Christmas is the season for mulled wine and hot toddies! Whilst these might make you feel warm and toasty for a brief second, alcohol causes your blood vessels to dilate. This brings that nice warm blood up to the surface of your skin, giving you a temporary warm glow. This” glow” is quickly replaced by a drop in core body heat as the warm blood is diverted away. If you then walk home after an evening in the pub, be aware that you’ll have a lot of warm blood on the surface of your skin, so you’ll lose heat very quickly and easily- which could be dangerous. (More here)

Secret 4: Relieve back pain by lining your shoes.

If you’re standing around in the cold, it’ll quickly creep up into your legs and give you the chills. This can aggravate ankle, knee and lower back pain so make sure you have an extra layer between you and the ground. You can pick up lambswool insoles from high street shoe shops and online.

Secret 5: Ditch the gloves, and opt for mittens instead.

Keep your fingers together in mittents. This means your fingers share their collective heat in an air pocket rather than being isolated as they are in gloves. Makes sense, doesn’t it? This is a great tip for people with arthritis or poor circulation.

How can we help?

Chiropractic care is gentle, safe and effective for a range of conditions and can help alleviate the pain and discomfort associated with a range of conditions including osteoarthritis of the knee and hip, sciatica, lower back and neck pain, and joint pain. We also provide you with specific advice and exercises you can use to help alleviate your condition.

Did you find this interesting? You might also want to read our blog on falls prevention, which covers who is at risk, how to avoid falls, and what to do if you do have an accident this winter. Read the blog here.

Plus, six top tips on how to boost your immune system! Read here.

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Six back pain myths- busted!

It may or may not surprise you to find out there’s a lot of misleading information about back pain out there- more specifically, about what to do when back pain strikes and how to prevent it from recurring. This has not only over-simplified how to treat back pain but also lead to some weird and wonderful rehabilitation strategies.

Let’s bust a few of these back pain misconceptions.

1. Sit-ups will help improve your spinal health

Did you know that the average sit-up causes compression of the lower back that almost exceeds the safe limits set by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (the unified set of manual lifting recommendations based on the convergence of medical, scientific, and engineering points of view which helps determine safe work practices)

Physical fitness does have an impact on our spinal health, but it is more important that we are getting fit in the right way. Studies have shown that increasing abdominal strength through sit-ups causes stress on the discs in our back and compresses the lumbar spine- enough for researchers to conclude that sit-ups may cause problems in almost anyone.

2. “Lift with your knees, not your back”

Have you ever tried to do this? Ever tried to do it all day long? It’s almost impossible to do this every single time we go to lift something. Forget the old squat technique, instead, the way you lift should depend on what you’re lifting, where you’re moving it to, your own build, how many items you have to lift and so on.

For more information on how to lift correctly (and give your knees a break) click here.

3. Strong muscles, strong back

Feet back pain chiropractic chiropractor osteopath physiotherapy massage back pain neck pain treatment injury recovery Hampshire Emsworth Chichester SussexNot so, my friends. Muscle strength doesn’t help us predict who will or won’t get back problems, and focusing too much on strength instead of stability will be sure to cause problems. Instead, focus on muscular endurance (i.e. how long your muscles can sustain an activity for). Remember, muscles have three main properties: flexibility, strength and endurance. Any issues that results in a lack of flexibility, strength or endurance will be enough to stimulate the nerves within your muscles and start telling your brain that something’s wrong. What’s the end result of that? Pain.

4. Tight hamstrings and unequal leg lengths cause back problems.

These types of issues are often given as easy diagnoses to simplify the cause of a patients’ complaint. Don’t be fooled. Some studies have shown that in athletes with ‘tight’ hamstrings, these muscles function almost like springs, to help jump higher or run faster. It rather appears that tight hamstrings aren’t the issue, it’s how well these tight hamstrings can cope with stretching that determines whether or not you’ll have back pain. Studies have found that people with chronic back pain tend to use their hamstrings instead of their gluteal muscles to extend the hip, which can increase the amount of force on the spine during squatting- correcting this is going to be a fundamental aspect of care.

Interestingly, back pain also wasn’t found to be definitively linked with leg length discrepancies even in cases where the difference in length was 5cm!

5. Scoliosis= A lifetime of back issues?back pain neck chiropractic scoliosis myth chiropractic chiropractor spine health acorn health emsworth chichester hampshire treatment therapy portsmouth southampton

Not true! We see so many adults who were abruptly diagnosed with a ‘scoliosis’ after being
asked to bend forwards and touch their toes by the school nurse back in the 1970’s.  The difficulty with this is that
the tests for assessing scoliosis have a false positive rate of at least 60%, and the statistical risk of having a scoliosis that requires treatment is only 0.2%.  Why are we telling you this? Because once we’re told we have a “condition” it becomes ingrained in us. Part of who we are. So time and time again we see adults who tell us they have a “scoliosis”, and have been plagued by a lifetime of avoiding activities because of their diagnosis, when mild scoliosis (less than 30 degrees deviation) may simply be monitored and treated with exercise.

6. Knees to chest- the ultimate back stretch

Sure, it feels good, lying on the floor pulling your knees into your chest. Depending on your diagnosis, it might even be the right exercise for you, but if you’re one of the many patients I see who doesn’t cope well with forward bending, this exercise isn’t ideal. Why? Because pulling the knees to the chest gives you the perception of relief from your lower back pain (because the stretch receptors in your erector spinae muscles are stimulated) but this type of exercises causes more cumulative damage to the discs, leading to increased pain and stiffness the next day. As practitioners, we know to eliminate these type of exercises and prescribe ones appropriate for your needs- in fact this bespoke rehabilitation plan is one of the main benefits of coming to see a chiropractor.

 

So where do we go from here?

As you can see, misleading information and advice regarding back pain can lead to us performing the very movements that worsen our back pain in our attempts to get it better. Ensuring you have an accurate diagnosis, treatment plan and rehabilitation strategy is vital to recovery.No treatment plan can be truly successful without incorporating spinal rehabilitation exercises that work to remove the faulty movement patterns that cause back pain problems.  We have to work with our clients to ensure that we incorporate exercises that help you build the capacity of the muscles in your back to cope with the tasks you ask of it each day. As you can imagine, each persons’ day is different, and so your treatment plan will be too.