Tag: Chichester harbour

Fitness February

Throughout February we have been posting our top tips to get fit and healthy the best way possible in February. Here’s to committing to your workouts after the initial ‘New Year’ rush! Are you ready for our top tips to conquer ‘Fitness February’!? (More to be added soon!)

Protect Your Neck – Tuck your chin in and put your tongue on the roof of your mouth when you do crunches. It will help align your head properly, which helps reduce neck strain.

Don’t exercise when you’re sick – You’re better taking a day off so your body will use its resources to heal itself, not build muscle and endurance.

If you want to exercise before work but aren’t a morning person, try this trick: For a set period, let’s say 4 weeks, force yourself to get up 15 minutes earlier than normal and go outside for a quick walk. Make it so easy that you don’t even have to change into your workout clothes. As you near the end of the 4 weeks, you’ll have a new habit and will then be able to progress to either longer walks or a run in the morning!

Improve your balance – Stand one-legged on a sofa cushion and move a medicine ball (or heavy phone book) from hand to hand, side to side, and behind your head. Once you’ve mastered the move, try it with your eyes closed. This technique will improve your balance, coordination, and body control, all important athletic attributes.

Run Injury-Free – One week out of every six, cut your weekly training mileage and frequency in half. You’ll give your body a better chance to recover, and you’ll avoid permanent, nagging injuries. Find out more in our Running without pain resource.

Run Hills Faster – When running uphill, keep your head up and your eyes focused on the top of the hill. This opens your airways, making it easier to breathe than if your upper body were hunched forward. Find out more in our Training, Injury prevention and recovery resource.

Loosen Your Hips – Keep your heels on the floor when you squat. If you can’t, your hip flexors are too tight and need to be stretched out! Try this stretch: Hold onto the sides of the squat rack and lower yourself until your thighs are parallel to the ground. Hold this for 30 seconds. Return to a standing position, then repeat five times

Replace Your Shoes (Not Your Knees) – To avoid injuries, write an “expiration date” on your shoes as soon as you buy them. Shoes last about 500 miles, so simply divide 500 by your average weekly mileage to determine how many weeks your shoes are likely to last.

End Back Pain – For every set of abdominal exercises you perform, do a set of lower-back exercises. Focusing only on your abs can lead to poor posture and lower-back pain.

St Georges Day Charity Dog Walk Success!

Earlier this year, we organised the St Georges Day Charity dog walk around Thorney Island in aid of Hounds for Heroes. Due the the success of the trial event, we have begun organising the next St Georges Day dog walk for Sunday 23rd April 2017! We already have renewed support from The Emsworth Business Association and have a new sponsor which is a local organic dog biscuit company – Beautiful Joe’s to treat our furry friends. Attend the event on Facebook here so you can keep up to date.

 

St Georges Day dog walk acorn health hounds for heroes

Hounds For Heroes are a charity based in Petersfield who provide specially trained assistance dogs to injured or disabled men and women from the UK Armed Forces and UK Civilian Emergency Services. Hounds For Heroes provide all specialist training, in addition to covering pet food and vet bills for life for each of these talented pups, at a cost of £30,000 per dog.
Dog Walk Details
Suggested donation is £5 per dog, dogs can bring their owners, family members and anyone else who would like to come along! Additional sponsorship forms can be found online here: http://houndsforheroes.com/get-involved/document-downloads/sponsorship-form/
 
Starting Point: Thornham Lane, just past the Thornham Marina.
Some parking spaces (20 spaces max) have been kindly offered to our event by Thornham Marina – All dogs must be kept on leads here due to heavy vehicles moving around on site.
 
The full walk is approx 8 miles around the Island (approx 3.5 hours). Why not take a picnic and enjoy some refreshments at St Nicholas’ Church or Thorney Island Sailing Club, near the halfway point.
 
For those with little legs looking for a shorter walk there is a gate-to-gate option that doesn’t take you around the full island. Please be aware that livestock graze close to the path so dogs should be under their owner’s control.
 
All donations made will be presented to Hounds for Heroes.

Five top tips for avoiding sailing injuries and back pain

Living and working in Emsworth and Langstone, you’ll know that sailing is an inherent part of our community here (so much so, we’ve included some photos taken by Philippa of our lovely harbour!) As such, it’s not uncommon for us to be treating professional or recreational sailors in clinic, and whether you compete professionally or just enjoy a turn about the Solent, sailing poses as much a risk of injury as with any sport.Sailing windsurfing sport water exercise fitness health sail sailor boat boating yacht yachting dinghy barge windsurf chiropractor chiropractic physiotherapy physiotherapist osteopath osteopathy injury exercise health hampshire langstone emsworth fareham Sailors often compete in extremely difficult conditions, battling high winds and rough seas, and as such the risk of injury during sailing is 8.6 per 1000 hours sailing when training, and 2.2/1000 otherwise.  In a study on the 2003 America’s Cup, researchers found that the upper limb was the most commonly injured body segment (40%), followed by the spine and neck (30%), and the most common injuries were joint/ligament sprains (27%) and tendinopathies (20%). (1)

Who is at risk of injury?

Mastmen are at greatest risk of acute injuries, helmsmen most commonly injury the upper-limb through steering, whilst grinders and bowmen are at the greatest risk of injury from repetitive strains.  High repetition activities such as hiking, pumping, grinding and sterring are major causes of overuse injury, even in the most experienced of sailors.  Windsurfers are also frequently admitted to hospital suffering from chronic lower back injuries as a result of “pumping” the sail.

 

Sailing windsurfing sport water exercise fitness health sail sailor boat boating yacht yachting dinghy barge windsurf chiropractor chiropractic physiotherapy physiotherapist osteopath osteopathy injury exercise health hampshire langstone emsworth fareham
Windsurfing in Emsworth- photo taken by Philippa!

It’s not just the professionals who are at risk of injury, as novice and recreational sailors commonly encounter acute injuries such as contusions or abrasions after colliding with the boom or other equipment whilst performing manoeuvres. (1)  Not only that, but there are other perils to consider:  tripping over ropes, winches and cleats; being swept overboard or falling down open hatches!

 

How and why do sailing injuries occur?

[clickToTweet tweet=”What are the main contributors to #sailing #injuries? Find out here! #Chiropractic” quote=”The main contributors to sailing injuries are: Heavy weather (23%), tacking (17%), jibing (13%), sail change (12%) and alcohol (7%)”]

  • Injuries may result from a lack of general fitness, overuse, overtraining, or macrotraumatic accidents.

  • Lack of warming up, stretching, and cooling down may also increase the risk of injury.

  • Muscles are placed at high risk when performing explosive, powerful moves, such as those frequently required when sailing.

  • Shoulder and arm injuries are common through constant handling of the mainsheet, and the sudden, strong movements in hiking may lead to back and knee problems.  (Remember Sir Ben Ainslie’s back injury? This was caused by repetitive, high strain hiking out!)Sailing windsurfing sport water exercise fitness health sail sailor boat boating yacht yachting dinghy barge windsurf chiropractor chiropractic physiotherapy physiotherapist osteopath osteopathy injury exercise health hampshire langstone emsworth fareham

  • Inadequate leg strength and poor hiking technique are thought to predispose the knee to injury.

  • Boats can be difficult to navigate around and result in crew members having to adopt awkward positions, often resulting in rotating, hyperextending, locking, or twisting of joints.

  • Incorrect lifting technique (more advice on this here!)

  • Postural problems are common in the majority of the population, and these inherent issues can lend themselves to musculoskeletal problems.

  • Poor fitness training may exacerbate common muscular imbalances associated with changing forces on opposing muscle groups while sailing.

If ignored, it is easy for these issues to progress into a chronic problem, the possible severity of which could impact on your participation and enjoyment in the sport.

So what can be done about it? Five simple steps to avoiding sailing injuries!

  1.  A robust exercise regime is crucial, which should focus on all aspects of physical fitness in order to ensure that your body can cope with the demands of sailing.
    – Cardiovascular training
    – Strength training (Competitive sailors should undergo regular health screening with specific strengthening of high-risk muscle groups, synergists and stabilizers. )
    – Flexibility training
    – Core stability training
    – For more advice on bespoke rehabilitation plans, please email us at acorn@acornhealth.org.uk or visit our Langstone clinic.
  2. Research has shown that aerobic training and fitness is directly related to an improved reaction speed to wind shifts, as well as enhanced endurance, decision making, and concentration, particularly in the later stages of races. Mental and physical recovery is faster for those who are physically fit. Suggested types of aerobic exercise that are most appropriate for sailors are rowing, cycling, swimming, stair climbing, or running.(3)/li>
  3. Regular checkups can help ensure joint movement and function is maintained, as well as provide an opportunity for assessment of joint strength and function.  Not only will this help reduce the risk of developing injuries, but it can also speed up recovery should you become injured.
  4. Technical skill and expertise is important– if your technique needs improvement, seek out advice and informed coaching to help minimise the risk of developing an injury as a result of poor technique.
  5. Taking frequent breaks and changing positions during long periods of sailing. This will help prevent postural stresses and strains from occurring and is a healthy spinal habit we all should follow.

Whilst we have focused on musculoskeletal injuries, there are a number of other safety measures to take into consideration. Above all, always wear a life jacket when sailing. In the UK, there were 35 sailing or water-sport related deaths at sea in 2014 alone. Safety at sea should always be taken seriously.

Want more advice or information on this topic? Email us at acorn@acornhealth.org.uk or call the clinic on 01243 379693.

Boat sailing acorn health chiropractic

References:
1. Neville, V., Folland, J.P. (2009) The epidemiology and aetiology of injuries in sailing.  Sports Medicine. 39(2) 129-145.
2. Nathanson, Mello, Baird “Sailing Injuries and Illness – Results of an Internet-based survey” Wild Env Med 2010
3. Allen, J.B., De Jong, M.R. (2006) Sailing and sports medicine: A literature review. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 40(7) 587-593.

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