Tag: acupuncture

Acupuncture- what is it, and how does it work?

Acupuncture is often seen as a form of complementary medicine, although it is used nationally in many NHS general practices, as well as the majority of pain clinics and hospices in the UK. It is recommended by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence as a treatment for lower back pain, and a range of other conditions.  If we decide together that acupuncture is a good choice for you within your chiropractic treatment, then we can start there and then!  Our chiropractor Philippa is fully trained and registered to use acupuncture as part of her treatments in clinic.

Acupuncture involves the insertion of needles (which are about the thickness of a human hair) into specific points in your body.  Mention “acupuncture” to someone, and you may think of someone with dozens of needles in their back looking like a hedgehog. It may surprise you to know that we tend to use a maximum of 6 needles in our treatments!  This is because we use a Western medical approach to acupuncture in clinic, which is different to traditional Chinese treatments.

Want to learn more?

A medical approach to acupuncture involves a few essential features:

  • Medical history, examination and clinical investigations (if necessary) are all used to form a diagnosis.
  • An appropriate plan of management, and appropriate needling points are identified.
  • As with all our treatments, the appropriate treatment is given, in a way that is carefully tailored to the individual.  This can mean using more needles (usually up to a maximum of 6), using percutaneous electric nerve stimulation, or increasing the length of time the needles are inserted.
  • Your response to treatment is monitored, and subsequent treatment is determined based on your response to this treatment.

Acupuncture is, in itself, a phenomenon- it produces an unique sensation, can alleviate pain in areas quite far away from where the needle is inserted, and patients have been known to spontaneously report feelings of improved wellbeing and deep sleep after treatment!  This treatment is also a powerful tool for pain relief, and this sometimes occurs immediately after removing the needles; several hours after treatment; or gradually accumulating over a course of several treatments.

So if acupuncture is a phenomenon, with varied responses for each individual, how do we know that it is an appropriate, evidence-based, effective treatment for you?

Here are five mechanisms to help explain how acupuncture works:

1) Acupuncture promotes healing.  It stimulates nerve fibres in the skin and muscle, and this leads to the release of a substance called CGRP- calcitonin gene-related peptide (no, we won’t quiz you on this later!)  This substance causes blood vessels around the needle to dilate, and increases blood flow, which encourages tissue healing.

2) When a needle stimulates nerve fibres, these travel to a specific part of the spinal cord, called the dorsal horn (which helps regulate pain signals). This stimulation helps to reduce the response of the dorsal horn to pain, and this is probably the main mechanism by which acupuncture relieves pain, and what it is most commonly used for.

3) These nerve signals then transmit up to the brain, and stimulate the body’s pain-suppressing mechanisms.  (Yes, our body can suppress pain- think about the times when you haven’t noticed a scratch or a graze because you’ve been concentrating on something else). This is why acupuncture is so helpful, as it can suppress pain throughout the entire body.

4) Parts of our brain that control emotion, behaviour and sleep are also stimulated by acupuncture, and so acupuncture has a calming effect and can improve our feeling of wellbeing.

5) When our muscles are strained or injured, it develops a small area of damage (called a trigger point) which can be slow to heal and can cause persistent pain.  Acupuncture helps to deactivate and reduce these trigger points.

If you would like to find out more about this type of treatment, what it can be used for and whether it could be a good option for you, book an appointment with us today!

Chiropractic Awareness Week 2022: Stay Active

Happy Chiropractic Awareness Week everyone!

Are you aware that over half of us regularly suffer with backaches, neck pain or headaches? So why not seek out professional advice sooner rather than later to sort out those pesky niggles before it becomes a serious problem.

Take care of the back you have, because we have never heard of a replacement spine, have you?!

Here are our top 5 tips to help you to spinal health bliss:

Sitting Posture: Support your lower back when sitting down at your desk or at home, try not to curl up on the sofa, as it’ll twist your spine causing back ache and possible problems in the future.

Bedtime: Sleeping on your back (with a pillow behind your knees) is best for your spine. If you really want to sleep on your side, then put a pillow between your knees so you don’t twist into the recovery position.

Keep active! Get into the habit of taking a brisk walk daily. Try to make it fun or work out with a group like  class or running group.

Pain is often a warning sign. If something is hurting, don’t ignore it. Particularly important this time of year when we start hitting that gardening again!

Ice. If you’re achy use an ice pack, wrapped up in a tea-towel for 5-10 minutes every half an hour to calm any swelling and promote recovery.

We hope this helps, but if you would like more specialist advice for your particular problem please do not hesitate to contact our principal chiropractor Philippa Oakley.

E: acorn@acornhealth.org.uk
twitter.com/AcornHealthUK
facebook.com/AcornHealthUK

low back pain pregnancy symphysis pubis dysfunction Pregnancy pelvis SPD pelvic girdle pain pubic symphysis low back pain pregnant expectant mother postpartum baby babies expecting mother motherhood father fatherhood children labour midwife breastfeeding chiropractic osteopath cranial osteopathy chiropractor Emsworth Hampshire Sussex

Chiropractic Care for Pelvic Girdle Pain and Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction

I saw a lovely lady in clinic today who was suffering with symphysis pubis dysfunction (SPD), which had been bothering her since she was just 16 weeks along in her pregnancy (she’s now nearing her due date). This is quite a common reason for people coming to see me in clinic, so let’s talk about pelvic girdle pain and how a chiropractor can help you.
26e099ea82c713b6c7df7882d42ef83f

Pelvic girdle pain (PGP) is common, but not normal, and as anyone will tell you, being in pain can really sap the joy out of your pregnancy. Symphysis pubis dysfunction is now broadly categorised as PGP- an umbrella term for all pain in the pelvic area which could include the lower back, abdomen, hips and thighs. PGP can cause back, hip and groin pain, disrupt your sleeping and affect your walking, amongst other issues. It’s really not fun! Just to complicate matters further, SPD can affect you at any time during your pregnancy, and sometimes even after giving birth (if not managed appropriately). Needless to say, this can cause physical discomfort and emotional distress so it is important to seek help early on- the sooner treatment begins, the sooner you’ll feel better.

What is Pelvic Girdle Pain?

low back pain pregnancy
www.millerplace.k12.ny.us

Pelvic girdle pain simply means pain in the joints of the pelvic girdle, including the two sacroiliac joints at the back of your pelvis and the symphysis pubis joint at the front of your pelvis. Dysfunction within the pelvic girdle can affect the pelvic floor (the basket of muscles which hang from the bones of our pelvis), and if the pelvic bones are rotated or dysfunctional, the muscles don’t hang (or function) correctly, affecting spreading of the pelvic floor muscles and symmetrical dilation of the cervix during labour. This can lead to a difficult birth process for both mum and baby, but fortunately if good care has been taken to protect the pelvic girdle from additional strain and trauma, most women with PGP can have a normal vaginal birth. If you are concerned about the birth process, do discuss this with your practitioner, midwife or GP.

SPD can worsen as the baby increases in weight, as a result of postural changes as pregnancy advances, and resultant changes in the body’s centre of gravity. During pregnancy, our body releases a hormone called relaxin which softens our ligaments (which are like strong elastic bands which connect our joints)- this is to allow the baby to pass through the pelvis during birth, and normally lax ligaments in the pelvis during pregnancy do not cause an issue, however uneven movement in the pelvic joints (often termed “misalignment”) or imbalance in the muscles can cause irritation to the joints of the pelvis, resulting in pain.

To a chiropractor there are numerous other issues in the pelvis that can cause PGP without it being SPD (Gosh, that’s a lot of abbreviations!) so it’s important to rule out other possible causes before working on a diagnosis of SPD.

What are the symptoms of PGP?

  • Pain in the joints of the pelvis
  • Difficulty walking
  • Clicking or grinding in the pelvic area
  • Pain on weightbearing on one leg (for example when climbing stairs)
  • Pain when performing straddle movements (for example getting in or out the car or bath)
  • Difficulty lying in particular positions (often side-lying)
  • Pain during intercourse

Why do some pregnant ladies develop PGP and others don’t?

It’s hard to say… the research in this area is largely inconclusive when it comes to identifying risk factors for developing pelvic girdle pain, but we do know one of the major reasons for developing back pain in pregnancy and having difficulties during labour is poor musculoskeletal health in the mother. Why? Well, a job that involves a lot of sitting down and little exercise out of work can mean that the tone and activity in the muscles that stabilise the pelvis (such as the abdominals, pelvic floor muscles and the gluteal muscles in the buttocks) is reduced, and they struggle to tolerate additional stress during pregnancy which can lead to ongoing discomfort.

Around 20% of pregnant women will develop some form of pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy and we know that other risk factors include a history of pelvic or lower back pain (both during pregnancy and when not pregnant). The good news is that whilst 1-2 % of patients may have persistent pain one year after giving birth, in 93% of cases, the symptoms of PGP settle within the first 3 months post delivery.

What can be done to help pelvic girdle pain and symphysis pubis dysfunction?

Pregnant patients require a gentle, drug-free alternative for treating their discomfort and so seeking chiropractic care is a logical choice as it is a safe and effective treatment option, not only for treatment of pelvic girdle pain but also other musculoskeletal problems that may arise during pregnancy. Not only that, but it can help avoid a difficult labour, may mean you can stay at work longer and can reduce long-term disability.

low back pain pregnancy Pregnancy pelvis pelvic girdle pain pubic symphysis low back pain pregnant expectant mother postpartum baby babies expecting mother motherhood father fatherhood children labour midwife breastfeeding chiropractic osteopath cranial osteopathy chiropractor Emsworth Hampshire SussexChiropractic treatment doesn’t just involve manual adjustments of the spine (chiropractic care is SO much more than that). We use numerous gentle techniques during treatments including soft tissue work, fascial release, acupuncture, exercises, postural advice (including optimal foetal positioning) and perhaps most importantly, we work with you to ensure you understand your condition and know how to manage it.  Chiropractic treatment is recommended for pelvic girdle pain by the Pelvic Obstetric and Gynaecological Physiotherapy- you can read their guidance on PGP here.

In the case of our patient, we adjusted the sacroiliac joints and pubic symphysis, but in addition we also adjusted the thoracic and lumbar spine, and released the diaphragm and psoas muscles in the abdomen as we know that these abdominal muscles are key contributors to pelvic pain. Remember- only a fool treats where the pain is, so as chiropractors we have to make sure that all factors contributing to the pain have been addressed! Our patient also went away with some kinesiology tape on her pelvis for support- more about that here.

Is there anything else I can do to help?

Yes- there are some simple exercises that you can do at home to help alleviate discomfort. In addition to giving you exercises we also advise you on ways to move that will help protect your pelvis and avoid aggravating the condition. Always speak to your practitioner to determine if an exercise is appropriate before attempting it. All the exercises we provide our patients are bespoke to them based on the results of their examination.

Sometimes a pelvic belt can offer relief, particularly when you’re up and moving around.  We prefer to use kinesiology tape to help our pregnant patients as this provides support to the structures without limiting movement.low back pain pregnancy Pregnancy pelvis pelvic girdle pain pubic symphysis low back pain pregnant expectant mother postpartum baby babies expecting mother motherhood father fatherhood children labour midwife breastfeeding chiropractic osteopath cranial osteopathy chiropractor Emsworth Hampshire Sussex

If you’d like to find out more about how chiropractic can help during pregnancy, download our resource here.

We’ll also be running some kinesiology tape during pregnancy workshops periodically throughout the year, so make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and follow our facebook page to keep up to date with these events.

References:

  • Aas-Jacobsen E. and Miller J. (2010) Chiropractic care during pregnancy: survey of 100 patients presented to a private clinic in Oslo, Norway. JCCP. Vol. 11. No.2. 771-774.
  • Andrew C. and Dorey G. (2008) Pelvic girdle pain in three pregnant women choosing chiropractic management: a pilot study using a respondent generated instrument and chiropractor’s assessment tool. Journal of the Association of chartered physiotherapists in women’s health. 102. p.12-24.
  • Andrew. C and Pedersen P. (2003) A study into the effectiveness of chiropractic treatment for pre- and post partum women with symphysis pubis dysfunction. European Journal of chiropractic. 48. P. 77-95
  • Borggren, C.L. (2007) Pregnancy and chiropractic: a narrative review of the literature. Journal of Chiropractic Medicine. 6 (2) 70-74
  • Daly, J.M., Frame, P.S., Rapoza, P.A. (1991) Sacroiliac subluxation: a common, treatable cause of low-back pain in pregnancy. Fam Pract Res J. 11(2) 149-59.
  • Elden, Ostgaard, Fagevik-Olsen, Ladfors Hagberg: Treatments of pelvic girdle pain in pregnant women: adverse effects of standard treatment, acupuncture and stabilising exercises on the pregnancy, mother, delivery and the fetus/neonate. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2008, 8:34doi:10.1186/1472-6882-8-34.
  • Howell, E.R. (2012) Pregnancy-related symphysis pubis dysfunction management and postpartum rehabilitation: two case reports. The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association. 56(2) 102-111.
  • Kanakaris, N.K., Roberts, C.S., Giannoudis, P.V. (2011) Pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain: an update. BMC Medicine 9:15.
  • Peterson, C.K., Mühlemann, D., Humphreys, B.K. (2014) Outcomes of pregnant patients with low back pain undergoing chiropractic treatment: a prospective cohort study with short term, medium term and 1 year follow-up. Chiropractic & Manual Therapies. 22:15
  • Vleeming, A., Albert, H.B., Östgaard, H.C., Sturesson, B., Stuge, B. (2008) European guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pelvic girdle pain. European Spine Journal. 17 (6) 794-819
Charity hounds for heroes emsworth chiropractor chiropractic back pain walk military thorney island hampshire

Charity Dog Walk Success!

We’re delighted to announce that our St George’s Day Charity Dog Walk has helped raise £398.35 for local charity Hounds for Heroes.

Our principle chiropractor Philippa comments, ‘Coming from a military family, it has always been important for me to give back to the military community. The event was a great success, and we are now planning for next year’s adventures. It was fun for all the family, and we all enjoyed the beautiful scenery of Chichester Harbour accompanied by a slice of cake baked by Emsworth Cookery School and a bottle of refreshing locally sourced water from South Downs Water who both kindly sponsored the event.’

Charity dog walk Hounds for Heroes Emsworth Chiropractor ChiropracticHounds for Heroes provide specially trained assistance dogs to injured and disabled men and women of both the UK Armed Forces and UK Emergency Services. Through this provision, Hounds for Heroes aim to provide help and practical support leading to an enhanced quality of life. Allen Parton, founder of Hounds for Heroes, comments, ‘This money will assist us in our aims of placing assistance dogs with injured veterans and emergency service personnel, Acorn Health’s event and support really does send such a positive message to those serving Queen and Country that folk at home really do care about them. Every single penny received makes such a huge impact on and difference to our work. We have a great organisation, staffed by serving members of the armed forces, which in itself is fairly humbling, but we couldn’t do it without others help as well.’

 

Emsworth charity dog walk chiropractor St George donations chiropractic North street palmers road havant chichesterAllen continues, ‘It is a thrilling time for us at the Training Centre as we have just had two new recruits join Squadron 4 so the sound of puppy paws running round the centre re-enforces our aim to improve and enhance the quality of our partner’s lives.’

Emsworth’s St George’s Day weekend of events was supported by The Emsworth Business Association, Havant Borough Council, Acorn Creative Ltd, South Downs Water, and Emsworth Cookery School.

Five top tips for avoiding sailing injuries and back pain

Living and working in Emsworth and Langstone, you’ll know that sailing is an inherent part of our community here (so much so, we’ve included some photos taken by Philippa of our lovely harbour!) As such, it’s not uncommon for us to be treating professional or recreational sailors in clinic, and whether you compete professionally or just enjoy a turn about the Solent, sailing poses as much a risk of injury as with any sport.Sailing windsurfing sport water exercise fitness health sail sailor boat boating yacht yachting dinghy barge windsurf chiropractor chiropractic physiotherapy physiotherapist osteopath osteopathy injury exercise health hampshire langstone emsworth fareham Sailors often compete in extremely difficult conditions, battling high winds and rough seas, and as such the risk of injury during sailing is 8.6 per 1000 hours sailing when training, and 2.2/1000 otherwise.  In a study on the 2003 America’s Cup, researchers found that the upper limb was the most commonly injured body segment (40%), followed by the spine and neck (30%), and the most common injuries were joint/ligament sprains (27%) and tendinopathies (20%). (1)

Who is at risk of injury?

Mastmen are at greatest risk of acute injuries, helmsmen most commonly injury the upper-limb through steering, whilst grinders and bowmen are at the greatest risk of injury from repetitive strains.  High repetition activities such as hiking, pumping, grinding and sterring are major causes of overuse injury, even in the most experienced of sailors.  Windsurfers are also frequently admitted to hospital suffering from chronic lower back injuries as a result of “pumping” the sail.

 

Sailing windsurfing sport water exercise fitness health sail sailor boat boating yacht yachting dinghy barge windsurf chiropractor chiropractic physiotherapy physiotherapist osteopath osteopathy injury exercise health hampshire langstone emsworth fareham
Windsurfing in Emsworth- photo taken by Philippa!

It’s not just the professionals who are at risk of injury, as novice and recreational sailors commonly encounter acute injuries such as contusions or abrasions after colliding with the boom or other equipment whilst performing manoeuvres. (1)  Not only that, but there are other perils to consider:  tripping over ropes, winches and cleats; being swept overboard or falling down open hatches!

 

How and why do sailing injuries occur?

[clickToTweet tweet=”What are the main contributors to #sailing #injuries? Find out here! #Chiropractic” quote=”The main contributors to sailing injuries are: Heavy weather (23%), tacking (17%), jibing (13%), sail change (12%) and alcohol (7%)”]

  • Injuries may result from a lack of general fitness, overuse, overtraining, or macrotraumatic accidents.

  • Lack of warming up, stretching, and cooling down may also increase the risk of injury.

  • Muscles are placed at high risk when performing explosive, powerful moves, such as those frequently required when sailing.

  • Shoulder and arm injuries are common through constant handling of the mainsheet, and the sudden, strong movements in hiking may lead to back and knee problems.  (Remember Sir Ben Ainslie’s back injury? This was caused by repetitive, high strain hiking out!)Sailing windsurfing sport water exercise fitness health sail sailor boat boating yacht yachting dinghy barge windsurf chiropractor chiropractic physiotherapy physiotherapist osteopath osteopathy injury exercise health hampshire langstone emsworth fareham

  • Inadequate leg strength and poor hiking technique are thought to predispose the knee to injury.

  • Boats can be difficult to navigate around and result in crew members having to adopt awkward positions, often resulting in rotating, hyperextending, locking, or twisting of joints.

  • Incorrect lifting technique (more advice on this here!)

  • Postural problems are common in the majority of the population, and these inherent issues can lend themselves to musculoskeletal problems.

  • Poor fitness training may exacerbate common muscular imbalances associated with changing forces on opposing muscle groups while sailing.

If ignored, it is easy for these issues to progress into a chronic problem, the possible severity of which could impact on your participation and enjoyment in the sport.

So what can be done about it? Five simple steps to avoiding sailing injuries!

  1.  A robust exercise regime is crucial, which should focus on all aspects of physical fitness in order to ensure that your body can cope with the demands of sailing.
    – Cardiovascular training
    – Strength training (Competitive sailors should undergo regular health screening with specific strengthening of high-risk muscle groups, synergists and stabilizers. )
    – Flexibility training
    – Core stability training
    – For more advice on bespoke rehabilitation plans, please email us at acorn@acornhealth.org.uk or visit our Langstone clinic.
  2. Research has shown that aerobic training and fitness is directly related to an improved reaction speed to wind shifts, as well as enhanced endurance, decision making, and concentration, particularly in the later stages of races. Mental and physical recovery is faster for those who are physically fit. Suggested types of aerobic exercise that are most appropriate for sailors are rowing, cycling, swimming, stair climbing, or running.(3)/li>
  3. Regular checkups can help ensure joint movement and function is maintained, as well as provide an opportunity for assessment of joint strength and function.  Not only will this help reduce the risk of developing injuries, but it can also speed up recovery should you become injured.
  4. Technical skill and expertise is important– if your technique needs improvement, seek out advice and informed coaching to help minimise the risk of developing an injury as a result of poor technique.
  5. Taking frequent breaks and changing positions during long periods of sailing. This will help prevent postural stresses and strains from occurring and is a healthy spinal habit we all should follow.

Whilst we have focused on musculoskeletal injuries, there are a number of other safety measures to take into consideration. Above all, always wear a life jacket when sailing. In the UK, there were 35 sailing or water-sport related deaths at sea in 2014 alone. Safety at sea should always be taken seriously.

Want more advice or information on this topic? Email us at acorn@acornhealth.org.uk or call the clinic on 01243 379693.

Boat sailing acorn health chiropractic

References:
1. Neville, V., Folland, J.P. (2009) The epidemiology and aetiology of injuries in sailing.  Sports Medicine. 39(2) 129-145.
2. Nathanson, Mello, Baird “Sailing Injuries and Illness – Results of an Internet-based survey” Wild Env Med 2010
3. Allen, J.B., De Jong, M.R. (2006) Sailing and sports medicine: A literature review. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 40(7) 587-593.
  • 1
  • 2

Join The Conversation

Unit 3
Stonehenge Walk
Amesbury
Wiltshire
SP4 7DB

Acorn Health Ltd © 2014- 2024

Website Created by WebHolism

Join The Conversation

Acorn Health © 2014 - 2022

Website Created by WebHolism