Almonds in a ceramic cup.

Almond Nut Butter

If you have a food processor, homemade nut butters are super easy to make. Here we’ve used almonds for their anti-inflammatory properties, but you can use any nuts you fancy. 

By making it yourself you avoid salt and sugars which some shop bought versions will contain (but not all – so if you do buy, then read the label as the more expensive versions can be 100% nut!). With this version, you can happily make this without the sea salt, but add it if you wish.

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Pearl Barley and Kale Soup

Pearl barley can really make a soup into a meal, it’s filling, low fat and brilliantly good for you!
Add to that some fresh herbs along kale and you have a real powerhouse of nutrients.

Method

  1. Warm the oil in a large saucepan. Add the carrots and celery and cook over a medium heat for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the rosemary, thyme, chilli flakes, vegetable stock and pearl barley. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 45 minutes or until the pearl barley is soft.
  3. Add the kale and cook for 5 minutes. Serve immediately.

Turmeric Latte

Turmeric lattes (also known as Golden Milk) are the drink of the moment and can easily be created at home. It is a great way to kick the day off, or as a snack when you get hungry mid afternoon, but don’t want anything too heavy.

The turmeric used in this recipe is a great anti-inflammatory and teaming it up with black pepper helps absorption.

Feel free to tweak the quantities of each ingredient to suit your taste.

Method:

  1. Put all of the ingredients into a small saucepan and gently heat for 10 minutes.
  2. After this time pour the mixture through a tea strainer, taste to see if more sweetness is needed, and then serve.

*jaggery is unrefined sugar which normally comes as a block, often found in Asian cookery. It is available in larger supermarkets and health food shops.

A quick smoothie can be the perfect way to start off your day and a homemade version means you can tweak the recipe to suit you.
This recipe doesn’t include banana, these seem to be in almost every smoothie you buy, but not everyone likes the flavour. Instead this recipe uses oat bran to thicken the smoothie, plus it adds a good amount of fibre to the smoothie. We also use frozen raspberries which act to chill the smoothie, as well as making it a recipe which works all year around. Thanks to Emsworth Cookery School for creating this super easy and nutritious smoothie.

Method

  1. Put all of the ingredients into a food processor or blender and whizz until smooth. Serve immediately.

Swallowing Awareness Day

Eating, drinking and swallowing difficulties have potentially life-threatening consequences. They can result in choking, pneumonia, chest infections, dehydration, malnutrition and weight loss. They can also make taking medication more difficult and they can lead to a poorer quality of life for the individual and their family.

Dysphagia can affect people at any stage of their lives and speech and language therapists support and enable them to eat and drink safely.

 

Are you, or someone you know, suffering from difficulties swallowing?

Swallowing difficulties, also known as dysphagia, affect a significant proportion of the population for a variety of reasons. Both adults and children can be affected and at any point in their lives. There is always an underlying reason for the swallowing difficulty and can be either short or long term, static or progressive. In any event advice should always be sought.

For adults swallowing difficulties can occur post stroke, from progressive neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, motor neurone disease, Alzheimers and other dementia’s. Those with learning difficulties or post traumatic brain injuries can also be affected, along with those post head and neck surgery. Even a urinary tract infection can affect a person’s swallow.

For children swallowing difficulties can occur with cerebral palsy, cleft lip and palate, muscular dystrophy, other cranio-facial abnormalities.

Swallowing difficulties can manifest as:

  • Coughing and choking during or after eating and drinking,
  • Feeling like something is stuck in the throat,
  • Loss of food and / or drink from the mouth,
  • Holding food or drink in the mouth and not swallowing,
  • Signs of anxiety or distress when eating or drinking,
  • Refusal to eat or drink,
  • Chronic weight loss,
  • Recurrent chest infections.

Chest infections and pneumonia can be due to food or drink going into the lungs instead of the stomach. With some people this can occur without any coughing or choking and is known as ‘silent aspiration’. As such difficulty with swallowing may have life threatening consequences and can lead to an impaired quality of life.

An impaired quality of life may not just be due to health and the physical aspect of swallowing but also due to embarrassment and lack of enjoyment of food, which can have profound social consequences for both the person and members of the family. Anxiety, distress and frustration can occur.

Treatment of swallowing difficulties is through a team approach. If you, or somebody you know is suffering inform the GP. They can then signpost you to professionals who can help:

Speech & Language Therapists (SLTs) : SLTs are fully qualified to assess, advise and treat swallowing difficulties. They are the first port of call when difficulties occur. They look at the swallow to determine what is working well and where difficulties might be occurring. As well as this they also look at how posture, environment, medication and anything else might be affecting the swallow. Different textures of food and drink may be trialled to determine what is the safest and most comfortable for someone to swallow. In addition strategies or exercises might be given to improve the swallow itself.

Occupational Therapists: They can look at the utensils that are being used and give advice on anything that could be used to assist e.g. special cups, adapted cutlery. They can also give advice regarding wheelchairs and positioning. All working towards a person being as independent as possible.

Chiropractors: Can listen to the chest post swallowing. They can advise on posture, address mechanical issues that may affect the swallow or help improve posture and can advise on breathing and exercises to keep the chest clear.

Physiotherapists: Physios can listen to the chest post swallowing. They can advise on breathing and other exercises to help keep the chest clear.

Dietitian: They will work very closely with speech and language therapists to look at the nutrition and hydration the person is receiving. If the person is unable to take much by mouth the dietitian can advise on supplements and how to fortify food in order to make sure the person is receiving adequate nutrition.

Throughout any intervention the person themselves, family and carers are central. They are the ones who experience what is going on day to day, give information to the therapist and implement strategies and advice. It is a truly collaborative approach.

So if you, or a loved one, are experiencing any difficulties with swallowing no matter how big or small please do seek advice – you can be helped! Reduce the stress, anxiety and discomfort, It’s time to enjoy meals again….

Frances Webster is an Independent Speech & language Therapist that specialises in working with adults, find out more about her and her services at Acorn Health here.

Rye bread with mackerel pate

You can’t beat homemade bread and this healthy rye bread teams fantastically with smoked mackerel pate for a great lunch. Obviously you could buy your bread, but the kneading is very therapeutic!

The first recipe in collaboration with Emsworth Cookery School to celebrate Nutrition and Hydration week (12-18th March 2018) is Rye bread with mackerel pate. Barbara has kindly worked with Philippa to create a selection of recipes that are great to help reduce inflammation and pain.

Method

  1. Start with the bread. Weigh the flours, yeast, sea salt and rosemary into a large bowl.
  2. Add the milk and water and work together to create a ball of dough. Knead for about 5 minutes. The dough will be really sticky – don’t worry about that.
  3. Place in a greased bowl, cover with cling film and leave to rise for about an hour, or until doubled in size.
  4. After the initial proving time, shape into an oval and place onto a baking sheet. Leave to prove again for about an hour.
  5. Preheat the oven to 200C/ fan 180C.
  6. Cut slashes across the top of your loaf and dust with rye flour.
  7. Transfer to the oven and bake for about 40 minutes. At the end of this time the loaf should sound hollow. Allow to cool on a rack.
  8. For the pate, check the fish for any bones, remove these and peel off the skin.
  9. Put the pate ingredients in a bowl and beat well. Taste and add salt and pepper if required. Refrigerate until required.
  10. To serve, slice the bread and grill on both sides, then serve alongside the pate.

Opening Times

Monday 08:30 – 19:00
Tuesday 09:00 – 19:00
Wednesday 09:00 – 19:00
Thursday 09:00 – 19:00
Friday 08:30 – 18:00

Lunch Break 13.00-14.00

Acorn Health © 2018

Website Created by WebHolism

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Opening Times

Monday 08:30 – 19:00
Tuesday 09:00 – 19:00
Wednesday 09:00 – 19:00
Thursday 09:00 – 19:00
Friday 08:30 – 19:00
Saturday 09:00 – 12:00

Acorn Health © 2018

Website Created by WebHolism